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Five bad eating habits to break

Published on March 03, 2016

Five bad eating habits to break

Kristen Bricko, Registered Dietitian
Alyssa Monson, Registered Dietitian
CentraCare Weight Management

No eating while eating TVAs challenging and busy as life can get, throwing in a few bad habits may be all you need to keep your sanity, right? Let’s take a look at some habits that are worth breaking before they break you.

  1. No TV while eating. Watching TV (or using any electronic device) can lead to mindless eating. We may not be paying attention to what we are eating or how much we are having while focusing our attention on our favorite show. This can lead to extra eating and also can cause you to get into the habit of always eating while watching TV regardless of the time of day.
  2. No sugar except what is naturally found in fruit. If you want something sweet, eat fruit. Stay away from sugar and sweetened foods. Keep in mind that many artificially sweetened foods will contain quite a few calories.
  3. No snacks except for fruits, vegetables or lean proteins and only when you’re hungry. Common snack foods typically have a lot of calories and little nutritional value. If you are hungry between meals, eat only fruits and vegetables or a lean protein. To make it easier to make this choice, stock your home with a variety of ready-to-eat vegetables and fruits.
  4. No eating out of boredom (or any reason other than hunger). Before reaching for food, make sure to examine if you are truly experiencing hunger. You may be bored or eating out of habit. Use H.A.L.T. (Hungry, Angry, Lonely, Tired) to examine if you are experiencing true hunger.
  5. No eating out, unless the meal fits your plan. Eating out is associated with weight gain. If you must eat out, make sure you order foods and beverages that fit your plan. To help make it easier, check out if the restaurant has their menu posted online and pick out your meal before you go.

Health information accessed through www.centracare.com is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. We strive to present reliable, up-to-date health information on our web site and “For the Health of It” blog. However, this information is not intended for the purpose of diagnosing or prescribing. Please contact your health care provider if you have any concerns or questions about specific content that may affect your health. Log in to MyChart to send a secure message to your provider.

About the Author

Alyssa Monson, RD

Alyssa Monson
Registered Dietitian
CentraCare Weight Management
Learn more about Alyssa

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About the Author

Kristen Bricko, RD

Kristen Bricko
Registered Dietitian
CentraCare Weight Management
Learn more about Kristen

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